PR Start by Nick Lucido

How to start in the public relations industry.

My New Blog Reads

As if I don’t read enough I did some searching around for some new reads. I think that subscribing to a bunch of PR (or whatever industry you’re looking at when you graduate or currently work in) is great, but finding content that is related to your industry is just as beneficial.

Here’s what I came up with and recommend all of them.

The White House Blog. Democrat, Republican… or anything else… you should be reading this. With the new administration’s apparent commitment to transparency and ethics (woo hoo!), one can hope that this blog is going to be used to promote what is actually going on in Washington.

PR Watch Blog by the Center for Media and Democracy. I wrote in my last post about how it’s important to learn from the critics, and I also found out that they had a blog. Check it out.

SPJ Blogs by the Society of Professional Journalists. You’ve got to give SPJ credit for their Code of Ethics. It’s the second result when you search “code of ethics” on Google (a lot higher than PRSA’s code) and they talk about relevant things in the media industry.

Flacker – A Digital Public Relations Weblog by Young PR Flack. This blog offers an interesting perspective on the field and provides some pretty solid content.

PR Works by David Jones of Hill & Knowlton. The thing that sold me on this blog was their video on how the Flight 1549 Wikipedia page updated over 90 minutes. There is also plenty of other worthwhile content, so definitely subscribe to this one.

Learn It, Live It, Love It – the PR book club. Yes, we have plenty to read with work and class, but this is a fun way to network and learn. While I might be one of the group managers and a little biased, we’ve got some great things going on with this. Check it out.

I did some searching with the Google Blog Search, as well as Alltop and Technorati. All are great places to search for topics, as well as clients, future employers and yourself.

Anyone else have any good finds recently?

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Filed under: New Media Drivers License, Public Relations, Social Media, , , , , , , ,

Learning from the Critics

I don’t remember exactly how I came across this Web site, but I did last night. It’s called PR Watch and it is run by the Center for Media and Democracy. Here’s how they describe their organization:

“The nonprofit Center for Media and Democracy strengthens participatory democracy by investigating and exposing public relations spin and propaganda, and by promoting media literacy and citizen journalism, media ‘of, by and for the people.'”

Ouch.

Then there’s this video featuring John Stauber, co-founder of PR Watch, who makes the argument that PR = Propaganda. Watch it here.

Double ouch.

I respectfully disagree for plenty of reasons, but that’s not why I’m writing this post (I’ll be writing posts on this later). After searching through the site and reading what they have to say on some different PR companies and campaigns, it’s easy to throw it away as garbage because we’re on the other end of the spectrum. I’ll argue that it’s important to listen to what they have to say in order to improve the industry.

So, as PR practitioners and students, we can take this in one of two ways:

  1. Do any combination of: whining, blaming, disagreeing, fighting, etc.
  2. Respect their opinions and move forward.

I’m thinking the second choice is a little better. The Ogilvy PR Digital Influence Blog has a post on how to deal with negative detractors in the social media sphere, and it’s pretty applicable to this situation. Here are their steps with my additions:

  1. Always say thank you. I like that they point out what they think is bad PR and bad ethics. It’s great that the industry is held accountable to PRSA’s Code of Ethics.
  2. Address the issue. Let’s acknowledge the faults and see what we can do to make it better in the future.
  3. Correct any misinformation. Opening channels of discussion to see what’s wrong and talk it out. I like to think that #journchat on Twitter is a 3-hour Dr. Phil episode that occurs each Monday evening where PR practioners and journalists talk about improving relations. I also think PRSA (and PRSSA) and SPJ should work together on this, too, as each both have ethical codes.
  4. Be transparent and honest. Even more important is regulating and enforcing these ethical standards.
  5. Opportunity is knocking on the door – it’s the future of the industry. Educating young PR professionals and PRSSA members on past mistakes can help make a better future. Teach us to take the right path for our careers.

I’ve found that you can learn the most from your critics. I’ve also learned that you can never learn enough. I’ll be perusing PR Watch and use it a guideline of things not to do in my career. Whether it’s accurate or not isn’t the point.

What do you think of PR Watch? Do you think it’s accurate? Can we learn from our critics? These are questions you should answer – here and in your career.

Filed under: Professional Development, PRSSA, Public Relations, , , , , , , , , , , ,

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